Tag / Mental health

Mindful Forgiveness: Finding Peace in the Hurt

 

For many, forgiveness is viewed as a way of giving in, making allowances or excuses, letting another person “win,” or showing weakness.

For the unforgiving, grudges are held, intense emotions are clung onto with a sense of desperation, for the purpose of fighting back, trying to obtain justice, or somehow attempting to prove a point or change what was done in the past.

However, resisting forgiveness in this way is exhausting, defeating, and ultimately, a way of letting the other person take control over you.

On Starting Something New: How to Embrace & Own Change

Change is stressful, especially when it’s unexpected change. But even planned, positive change can put you on your toes!

People have a general tendency to fear the unknown. Oftentimes, we’d rather stick with what we know because it’s familiar and, well, let’s face it, the familiar is comfortable. When we look into a future of unknowns it tends to feel largely out of our control, and this lack of control is what tends to make us feel stressed. So, when we think about starting something new, we might hesitate, make excuses, or save the change for “one day when…”

How is it, then, that you can stop procrastinating and actually make change happen?

Introducing Our Private Mindfulness Meditation Training Sessions

How It Changed My Life, and How It Can Change Yours, Too

No matter where I go or what I’m faced with in this life, one consistency that I find myself with is my ability to turn inward – not in a self-destructive way (although, admittedly, this does happen from time to time), but in a way that allows me to befriend, get to know, and take care of myself like I would my own best friend, a loved one, or my very own child.

The Importance of Reconnecting with Your Values

(3.5 min read)  We all get lost from time to time. That’s part of being human.

Sometimes life throws you unexpected curve balls, but sometimes you make a series of conscious decisions that, without you even realizing it at the time, end up throwing you so far off course that you wake up with the sudden realization, one day, that you hardly even recognize yourself anymore.

Introducing Our 4- Week Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation Course

Did you know that, according to Statistics Canada, nearly a quarter of all Canadian adults rate their daily stress levels as moderate to high? And, did you know that stress accounts for lower quality of life and can have significant negative impacts on your physical and mental health?

If ongoing stress is playing a role in your life, or if you would otherwise like to practice slowing down the fast pace of your busy world, then this is the course for you!

Join Lindsay Dupuis, Mental Health Counsellor, for this 4-week course in which you will learn how to take control of your mind and gain energy back through a series of educational lessons and guided meditations…

Start Your Day off Right with this 10-Minute Morning Routine

(4 min read)  Everyone has a morning routine as unique as the house they live in.

Some are long and complex. Others are quick and to the point. I’d be willing to bet, though, that just about everyone’s morning routine involves making themselves look more presentable. Showers wash away flat morning hair, toothpaste strips away bad breath, make-up covers flaws, and clothing camouflages bodily imperfections. For a society that values physical appearances, many of us make this a priority in order to put our best faces forward.

When Anti-Depressants Don’t Work For You

depressedBefore the year 2000, most medical approaches assumed that the adult brain continuously lost brain cells and was incapable of regeneration. We now know that the brain is incredibly plastic, meaning that it can adapt, grow, and heal. Up until 2 years ago, we believed that the brain was anatomically entirely separate from our immune system. However, the very recent discovery of lymphatic vessels that directly connect the brain to our immune system have incredible implications for our broader understanding of brain health. Add to this a growing body of compelling research linking aberrant immune function to mood disorders, and we finally have some serious tools to investigate alternatives to the traditional serotonin-promoting antidepressant pharmaceuticals that fail for so many people with depression. 

The Vein of Gold: All are welcome to join us.

vein-of-goldIn the spring of 2016 some of us gathered at the clinic to do Julia Cameron’s book The Artist’s Way. It is a 12 week course on recovering the creative self. We started each week with a brief check-in to update each other regarding our creative journey. After our check-in, and a discussion of the week’s chapter, we each took a turn weekly to introduce and share a creative activity with the group. There was lots of laughter, learning and play time.

IN JANUARY 2017 we would like to take on another one of Julia Cameron’s books on creative recover, The Vein of Gold.

Anxiety in Children

with child

By Dr. Angela Hunt, BSc ND

 When I started in naturopathic medicine I was so excited to work with kids. I assumed I would be treating lots of upset tummies and stubborn rashes. Don’t get me wrong, I do commonly treat gastrointestinal issues and eczema in little ones. Yet, there is another condition that I treat far more and it may surprise you. Anxiety is by far one of the most common ailments I see in children walking through my door. I never would have guessed that stress and anxiety are so rampant in our children, but research confirms my experience and shows that anxiety is on the rise.

Several studies show consistently that there has been a dramatic increase in anxiety and depression among children and adolescents over the past three decades. It should not be shocking that with this increase we have also seen a marked increase in the prescribing of anti-anxiety medications among pediatric populations. Children as young as two years old have been reported to be on Prozac (a common anti-anxiety medication). This is clearly alarming, and I’d like to go over what anxiety looks like in children, why it is on the rise, and some naturopathic alternatives to pharmaceuticals. 

Improving Memory with CogMedTM

5, 8, or 10 week options ● Ongoing one-on-one sessions

with Phillip Wendt, Occupational Therapist

CogMedTM is a medically proven computer based solution for attention problems caused by poor working memory. Increased working memory allows you to experience better focus, resist distractions, control impulses, and engage in longer and more complex discussions.

Please read more about brain training options, here on our blog.

Some insurance providers may cover the entire cost of the program when facilitated by an Occupational Therapist.

Q: How does Massage Therapy help treat depression?

Joel Ackerman, RMT

A: Nowadays someone who is dealing with depression has a growing number of treatment paths available to them. One option that research is showing to be more and more effective is Registered Massage Therapy. There is growing evidence that Massage is an effective part of a holistic approach to treating depression and other mood disorders. Massage Therapists are now educated about depression just like any other condition such as epilepsy or hypertension. Let’s examine the role that Massage Therapy can play as part of an integrated approach to dealing with depression.

The most well known benefits of Massage Therapy are stress reduction and relaxation. Stress arises from, and contributes to all illnesses. Massage Therapy helps combat stress by calming your nervous system and putting your body in a more relaxed state. In fact, Massage Therapy has been shown to reduce cortisol levels in your body by up to 40 percent after even a single massage!

What Causes Depression

Dr. Sonya Nobbe, ND

So you’ve been told that you have a deficiency of the “happy” brain chemical serotonin, and that a drug will help you feel better by increasing your body’s response to serotonin. But what caused that serotonin deficiency in the first place? And what will happen if you neglect to address this underlying cause by relying solely on the medication?

Research clearly demonstrates that chronic stress can cause serotonin deficiencies and depression. Many of us would agree that spiritual or emotional stress incurred during childhood or in our jobs and relationships, can lead to depression. But chronic ‘stress’ also applies to physiological (body) stress. Stress from chronic illness can stimulate biochemical processes (e.g. inflammation), in the body that “steal” nutrients otherwise used for serotonin production, thereby contributing to depression symptoms. This stress biochemistry is a survival strategy that our bodies have used theoretically since the caveman age, and we haven’t adapted yet to our fast-paced North American culture.

Our bodies are built to manage short bouts of high stress, such as what you might feel if suddenly attacked by a wild animal. Our bodies are not biochemically equipped to manage any amount of chronic stress, no matter how low grade, and no matter whether emotional, environmental, or physical. When “healthy” biochemical processes are put on hold in favour of those that support our stress response, nutrients are depleted, normal wear and tear on our bodies is not repaired, our bodies switch to inefficient energy production processes (i.e. we feel tired and ‘old’), and chronic disease progresses.

What common health conditions can cause this shift in our body’s biochemistry and drop in serotonin?