Tag / Physiotherapy

The Big Three to Relieve Low Back Pain

Back pain plagues four out of five Canadians at some point throughout their lifespan. It can be quite debilitating, and affects basic tasks throughout your day. Often clients describe how their back pain started, perhaps by reaching down to grab something off the floor or by twisting and reaching. This is often the straw that broke the camels back, however the true problem likely started many years before. We are very good at creating compensations and moving to get away from a problem. Over time compensating can create more wear and tear somewhere else in the body. Therefore, it is essential to have a look at how people are moving as a whole while comparing their movement to the local pain and dysfunction. This comprehensive view will give a clear picture as to larger movement problems or compensations that may be contributing to the acute problem and pain.

Recently, on CBC radio, a story featured Stuart McGill’s Big Three exercises to relieve back pain. Clinically, I use these exercises very frequently, even for people that may be having shoulder pain or even knee or ankle pain.

Preventing Injuries for the Fall Sporting Season

Many fall sports will kick off in the next few weeks, so consider some of these pointers to decrease the risk of injury which will keep athletes out of rehab and on the field!

A study was conducted that evaluated the effectiveness of preventive strategies and drew conclusions on the best practice for injury prevention. This study reviewed 154 clinical papers and found that preseason conditioning and education were the best protective tactics to fight in-season injuries. 

Prevention is the Best Treatment for Osteoporosis

Grandparents in the Neighborhood

There are many things that affect your risk for osteoporosis, with the primary modifiable factors being smoking, drinking and a sedentary lifestyle. However, the following exercises can help prevent or limit the effects of osteopenia and osteoporosis:

Strength Training: By using resistance of some type, whether it be weights or bands, we strengthen the muscle and, most importantly for osteoporosis, we strengthen the bone where the muscle attaches. Many women, who are more at risk than men, avoid strength training but this type of exercise is crucial to building and maintaining bone mass and quality. It is key to strengthen the posterior chain (or muscles through the back portion of our body) to maintain good posture and prevent rounding of the upper back (“hunchback”, or kyphosis), which can lead to vertebral fractures for those with osteoporosis.

Preventing falls in the home

Prince Edward Island - Canada

Living independently in one’s own home is something that we all want and strive for. This is both for ourselves and for our aging family members. But as we age, it can be harder to do so safely. Although declines in hearing, vision, strength, and mobility are a normal part of aging, falls do not have to be an irrevocable part of getting older. In fact, there are many simple things that people can do to help reduce the chance of falling at home.

First, stay healthy! That is certainly something that is easier said than done but, in this case, it refers to the basics. Stay active for at least 30 minutes every day. Even light activity around the house will keep muscles strengthened and challenge the balance centres of your brain. You can also do targeted exercise prescribed by a health care provider or join exercise groups specific to improving balance such as yoga or tai chi. 

Walk To Fight Arthritis: Volunteers Needed!

walk_logoThis June 4th, the first annual Arthritis Society’s Walk to Fight Arthritis will be held in Kingston and your help is required! The Arthritis Society Committee is currently looking for members of the community to join the fight, as we strive for an arthritis-free future. Kingston Integrated Healthcare’s Christine Campbell is the Marketing Coordinator for the Committee and is very excited to be a part of this event.

Healthy Gifts for the Holidays

presentsGift giving is one of my favorite things. Coming up with a special gift for people I care about means a great deal to me. I try and think about them as a person, the things that they love to do or want to do and that is how I base my creative thoughts. Maybe you are similar, or maybe you are a person who never knows what to get your friend or loved one. This year, think about their health as the primary focus. There are many great gift ideas that will let them know you’re thinking of them and will actually help them live happier and healthier.

Ontario Park Passes: Frontenac Park is in Kingston’s backyard and we often forget about it. There are many hikes of varying levels of difficulty to challenge you. A season’s pass to one of the local parks would be great gift for those who love to get outdoors and getaway from the hustle and bustle.

Did You Know? Physiotherapy can help with Peripheral Neuropathy!

christine-smallPhysiotherapists play a vital role in helping individuals improve and maintain functions that may be limited by Peripheral Neuropathy (PN). PN has a variety of causes, types and symptoms and therefore it is essential for each treatment plan to be tailored to help address each patient address their specific needs and goals. Physiotherapy may be helpful in maintaining strength, mobility, and function regardless of the underlying cause of PN.

Vertigo Treatments

Bright lights in sky from ferries wheel

Did you know physiotherapy can assist patients with vertigo?

A bad spell of vertigo can leave people feeling very debilitated.  Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and difficulty walking. There are many causes of vertigo, or dizziness, which include: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo BPPV, acute vestibular neuronitis or labyrinthitis, Meniere’s disease or migraine disorders. This article focuses on BPPV, which is the most common of vestibular disorders and the most easily treated. 

Smart Phones and Tablets Impacting Youth

Texting spine

Christine Campbell, Physiotherapist

As technology advances, the number of device related injuries that I see in clinic rises, especially with children. As many of us know, the number of children and teens using mobile devices and the amount of time spent utilizing said devices is increasing dramatically. One of the issues with mobile device use is the posture that is adapted, which causes movement dysfunction and pain.

A survey recently conducted by MediaSmart in 2014 indicated that 25% of kids 9-10 years old have their own cell phone. ParticipACTION reports that children (in 2015) spent, on average, 7.5 hours/day in front of a screen.  Each year these numbers rise and the impact on our children’s health is evident.